Archive For The “Blog” Category

The war over the thermostat and the psychology of air conditioning

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The war over the thermostat and the psychology of air conditioning

The war over the thermostat and the psychology of air conditioning Believe it or not, air conditioning offers a fascinating window into human psychology. "Yeah, it can be," said Todd Baker, the president and owner of Air Design Services, a commercial and residential heating and cooling in London, Ont. "It's a funny thing."  I've learned in this business no two people like the same temperature, you're never going to make anyone happy.– Todd Baker Baker said that in most offices, in every city in the country, every summer and every winter, there's a war going on for control of the office thermostat because people can't agree on how warm or cold their workplace should be.  "It's the just the way it is," he said. "I've learned in this business no two people like the same temperature, you're never going to make anyone happy," he said. "What one person is comfortable at, the other is cold."  'Dummy' thermostats Todd Baker is the owner and president of Air Design Services Heating and Cooling in London, Ont. (Todd Baker/ Air Design Services Heating and Cooling) In fact, employees in some offices fight so much over the office temperature that Baker says some employers install 'dummy' thermostats, where the only thing it offers employees is the illusion of control.  "We can hide the thermostat in the closet with the sensor and then they've installed dummy thermostats that people can play with," he said. "I've seen that done before because some people just need to feel like they're changing a thermostat."  High summer is Baker's busy season. His 20 employees are constantly busy when the temperature rises into the mid 30s, like it's been in southwestern Ontario for the past five days.  "When it gets this hot, things break down." – Todd Baker "These last couple weeks have just been insane," he said. "When the heat and humidity get this high, it causes a lot of breakdowns."  "The guy on call this weekend put on 35 hours," he said. "He worked more than three full days on-call. When it gets this hot, things break down."  One of the most common reasons air conditioners shut down in the summer is because they overheat, according to Baker.  Dirty air conditioners When the temperature goes up in the summer, the air conditioner goes on and it gets so cold for some office workers, they outside just to warm up. (Colin Butler/CBC News) "An air conditioner is pulling the heat from the inside of your house and throwing it outside. Well on a hot day it's hard to expel that heat into that air because it's just so hot."  It means a homeowner can end up getting a new unit if they lose their compressor. The way to avoid it in hot weather, according to Baker is to wash your air conditioner.  "These are the days they're going to break down if they're not clean," he said. "Most people don't realize their outdoor unit gets as dirty as they get. Quite often if…

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Hose pipe ban as NI Water say region facing “supply failures”

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Hose pipe ban as NI Water say region facing “supply failures”

Hose pipe ban as NI Water say region facing “supply failures” A hose pipe ban comes into effect at 6pm this evening as NI Water chiefs warn there could be “supply failures”. The move comes against a backdrop of soaring temperatures with highs of 30C this week and at least mid 20s over the weekend. The heat has been so high, railway tracks have been affected slowing trains down. And with no rain forecast in the coming days it is possible the ban could be prolonged. In a statement issued on Friday afternoon, NI Water said a hosepipe ban "will take full legal force across Northern Ireland from 6pm tonight and the public are being asked to limit the use of tap water to the essentials, like drinking, cooking and washing". They said the following activities are "prohibited during this period": Watering a garden using a hosepipe; Watering outdoor plants on domestic or other non-commercial premises using a hosepipe; Drawing water, using a hosepipe for domestic recreational use; Filling or maintaining a domestic swimming or paddling pool using a hosepipe; Filling or maintaining a domestic pond using a hosepipe; Cleaning a private leisure boat using a hosepipe; Cleaning a private motor vehicle using a hosepipe; Cleaning walls or windows of domestic premises using a hosepipe; Cleaning paths or patios of domestic or other non-commercial premises using a hosepipe. The company said they "would strongly advise the public to adhere to this advice as ignoring it will only cause further strain on resources and could lead to interruptions to supply". The move came after an earlier statement issued at around midnight, Thursday. In a statement, NI Water warned that the “continued use of water for non-essential purposes is likely to result in supply interruption in many areas”. Chief Executive Sara Venning added: “We have maximised our water production and need customers help to reduce demand. I am appealing to customers to stop non-essential water use – using hoses and sprinklers is causing demand to exceed the capacity to supply. “I would like to pay tribute to our staff who have been working through the night to ensure water treatment works are running at full capacity and in addition tankers have been deployed to assist with topping up service reservoirs. However, we also need the help of the public and businesses to reduce the level of demand. Read More “In recent days our treatment works have been operating at near maximum levels with over 700 million litres of water being put into the network which is some 25% more than is normal for this time of the year. Despite these steps, demand continues to outstrip supply. “It would be our intention to introduce a formal hose pipe ban in an effort to protect the public against the increased threat of supply interruptions. That process however requires some time to take effect and in the meantime, it is essential that we all work together to reduce the unprecedented levels of demand on our…

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What to expect in a home inspection

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What to expect in a home inspection

What to expect in a home inspection By Bev Knight   The lake real estate market has definitely picked up, and homeowners are finding it much easier to get offers on their correctly-priced properties.   However, getting an offer is only half the battle. Once you go under contract, your buyer is going to order a home inspection. These inspectors spend hours checking out every system in your home, the attic, the roof, crawl space, often the septic system, and sometimes even the dock. Even though you disclosed all previous problems, inspectors always find something. Once he generates a list of “issues,” the buyer’s agent will prepare an Amendment to Address Concerns with requests for repairs.  You have no contractual obligation to perform the requested repairs; however, if it is a leak or dangerous problem, the buyer will probably walk away if you don’t. Alternatively, they may ask for a reduction in price so they can make the repairs themselves. This reduction is often higher than the cost of the repairs, so it’s in your best interest to minimize the issues before the inspection.  In recent years, the most common cause of a contract that doesn’t close is a problematic home inspection. There are certain findings in an inspection that consistently scare buyers away from the purchase. Even if the problems can be fixed, they are often deal-killers because buyers perceive them as signs of bigger issues. If the buyer asks for the problems to be fixed before closing, they will almost always cost more than if you proactively fix them before the inspection.   First of all, you’ll take out the “rush” cost of the job, and you’ll be able to use yours or your agent’s contractor. Plus, you’ll be able to minimize the worry factor for your buyer and set the stage for a stress-free, efficient closing.  Here are some of the most common findings that you might want to address before you put your home on the market:  Leaks – When you list your property, you will be required to disclose any leaks you’ve had in the home and what you did to fix them. This includes roof leaks, plumbing leaks, overflowed tubs and toilets, anything! Don’t let that worry you because almost every house has a leak at some time. You should definitely have leaks fixed, but also be sure to fix the evidence of a previous leak. Even though you’ve disclosed the leak and described how it was resolved, buyers obsess over water spots and stains. Inspectors will find every one of them and usually suggest further evaluation (which you may have to pay for). If it’s a spot on the ceiling, paint it with Kilz (or comparable product), then repaint the ceiling so the old leak doesn’t show. If it’s in the basement, they’ll think it’s a leaky foundation. Even if it’s concrete floors or walls, make sure the leak has been resolved. Paint the affected area so it doesn’t show the old water stains. Of…

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PWNA FOAM

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PWNA FOAM

PWNA FOAM Pressure washing Convention PWNA Gurness IL 2009

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Graffiti Removal Phoenix Arizona Call Propowerwash.com 4805225227

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Graffiti Removal Phoenix Arizona Call Propowerwash.com 4805225227

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